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everydayafrica:

The grand market of Birhala takes place every Wednesday afternoon. Noisy place with lots of people and goods to be sold. Surrounded by the hills of South Kivu the atmosphere here is fascinating, especially towards the evening when the sun is getting ready to set. Democratic Republic of Congo. August 27, 2014. Photo by Jana Ašenbrennerová @asenbrennerova #drc #drcongo #asenbrennerova (at South Kivu, DR Congo)

humansofnewyork:

"I’ve sold fish in the market for the last thirty years, because I never had the chance to go to university. Recently my daughter graduated from Makerere, which is one of the best schools in the country. When I walked through the gates to attend her graduation, I felt so happy, because I never thought I’d see the inside of a university."

(Kampala, Uganda)

humansofnewyork:

"When they don’t think I’m watching, they do the funniest things. They are always dancing together. I found them in the kitchen yesterday, pretending to cook."
"What’s your greatest worry as a parent?"
"Their health. They’re always getting sick from the cold and the dust. Sometimes the dust gets so bad, they lose their voices."

(Nairobi, Kenya)

(via frenchemotioninmypassion)

humansofnewyork:

"I spent four years studying to get a degree in law, and I’ve spent almost as long trying to find a job. Here, unless you’re the family of someone in government, nobody will hire you. I sold my last cow, and now my money is almost completely gone. I’m getting evicted so I’ll have no choice but to go back to the village with my grandparents. At least we have farms there. After all this time in school, I’ve almost forgotten how to dig.” 

(Kampala, Uganda)

(via missjezebeljones)

Nakom

africanallstars:

A Ghanaian student’s vision of his future takes a sudden turn after his father’s death. Obligation and ambition clash in modern Africa.

Looks like a beautiful film. 

(via blackfilm)

ghanaian-and-a-half:

**Born Fathia Rizk
February 22, 1932
Zeitoun, Cairo
Kingdom of Egypt to a Coptic family.

But later taking her husband’s last name, becoming Fathia Nkrumah, the First-First Lady of a independent Ghana of March 6, 1957.

In this pic, she’s with her first child Gamal Nkrumah. Masha’Allah, it amazes me that the first-first lady in Ghanaian history was an Arab.

(via achickcalledl)

Black British & diaspora shorts outdoor screening powered by bicycles! 🚲 #2cool (at Black Cultural Archives)